Removing Garlic Skins

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?LUJRR 17 January 2015 Removing garlic skins
Garlic skins are removed by placing in a Folger coffee container and shaken for 30 seconds. This container is ideal since it has two protrusions into the cylinder which are perfect for bumping the clove and removing the skins.
Skin removed.

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Porridge.

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?PANAK 4 January 2015 Porridge
Porridge made from nixtamalized corn, oats, wheat, sorghum, and almonds.Each product is made into a slurry in the blender with added water. The ingredients are combined in a pot, and cooked in a double boiler for two hours.The cooked porridge is stored in liter containers and stored in the freezer until required.A bowl is heated in the microwave,served with skim milk and and ingested for breakfast.The products used vary depending upon what is available.
Porridge

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Mussels for Dinner 15 December 2014

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?IHEHX 15 December 2015 Dinner.
A pound of mussels from New Zealand was purchased. Three mussels make a fine meal with a tortilla and a glass of juice. The mussels were steamed for about 15 minutes in a butterfly steamer and served with a pad of butter. The excess was stored in the refrigerator.
Green-tipped Mussels

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Porridge Gruel

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?MOLMQ 12 December 2014 Porridge Gruel
A gruel/porridge was made from, hard wheat, nixtamalized Indian corn,groats,and sorghum.Each ingredient was blended fine with water and all was mixed in a cooking pot. The pot was placed in a double boiler to inhibit burning and cooked for two hours.The porridge was allowed to cool then placed in plastic containers and frozen until required. Each container has about four breakfasts. Compare this with supermarket packaged cereals.
Ingredients

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Masa Balls

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?WYOHZ 1 December 2014 Masa Balls
After making some Indian Corn Masa, it was decided to try making a different product. About half a liter of Masa was beat into a slurry in the blender, with two large eggs and a tablespoon of soy sauce for flavor.The slurry was then stiffened and made into a dough using commercial masa flour. The dough was made into golf ball size balls and pressure cooked for 15 minutes at 15 PSI. The end product makes a nourishing snack or addition to a meal and are most filling.They are for immediate use and are stored in the refrigerator. Picture depict the method.
Masa Balls

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Processing Soy Beans.

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?RPGMQ 29 November 2014 Processing Soy Beans.
One liter of dried soy beans were processed for a breakfast food. Procedure is rinse, boil for about half an hour, rinse again, soak for 12 hours,rinse, cook in pressure cooker for 1.5 to 2 hours. Blend into a slurry, add a bit of molasses for flavor. Store in containers. They will keep in the refrigerator for about ten days before spoiling. I usually store in the freezer to remove the spoiling concern. A bowl is ingested each morning.
Four meals

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Gruel Dehydrating.

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?EQCFK 29 November 2014 Gruel Dehydrating.
An experiment was made by dehydrating some recently made gruel. The end product would make a fine home dry cereal for camping or daily use. It is dry enough to keep for relatively long periods at room temperature. Process is to place on a tray and dehydrate for about eight hours at 145F.The powder is vacuum packed. I store mine in the freezer, since I won’t be using it for some time.
Powder

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Gruel

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?FZIYW 29 November 2014 Gruel
Five grain gruel was made from oats,almonds, wheat, sorghum, and nixtamalized Indian Corn. Process was grind in blender with water, cook in double boiler for 1.5 to 2 hours. Store in containers and freeze for long term use. The cooked gruel will keep in the refrigerator for about ten days without spoiling. A bowl is used for daily breakfast.Picture depict the process.
Storage

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Suntuf Panels for Garden Shed Roof.

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?QANAQ 21 September 2009 Shed Roof Replacerment with Suntuf Panels
In 2004 a shed was build and typical PVC panels was used for the roof. Similar to Palruf, but am not certain of the name at this time. It may even had been Palruf. This was desired for having ample light in the shed. The material went through about two seasons then it got brittle and cracks appeared. Clearly this material is almost useless for building. The roof was replaced with Suntuf, which is supposed to have a long life and is UV resistant. Both products appear flexible and strong when new. Suntuf is about $50.00 for a 2 by 12 foot sheet, whereas the old PVC panel is about $30.00 for a similar sized sheet.

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?HIJGI 15 November 2010 Roofing Garden Shed
The shingles were much deteriorated on the small 6 by 8 foot garden shed. It was decided to replace with Suntuf panels to improved the lighting. The hardware store only had two clear panels so two colored panels were selected in lieu. There are two sheds in the garden area, and this shed was inherited, when the property was purchased. It is small but structurally sound, and is used for the hand garden tools. Suntuf panels last as long as shingles, and improve the lighting inside the shed. The top surface of the small attached fuel box was also replaced, with rough pine boards (1 X 12 x 6 feet). Pictures depict the process.

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Sorghum Juicer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZi4vvwjCGw Extracting sugar cane juice using a home-made, Man-powered, ‘Green’ machine.
This rough do it yourself device is cheap and effective. It probably is functional for Sorghum and Sugar Cane for extracting small quantities of juice.

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