Shelling Corn

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?AQSBR 12 November 2014 Shelling Corn
Approached a local farmer and purchased 20 cobs of dent field corn for making tortillas.The corn was plucked from the plants, as fresh as one can get. My recently purchased crank corn sheller performed flawlessly. It took about 20 minutes to complete the shelling. Pictures depict operation.
Operation

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Processsing Soy Beans

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?FHVFT 10 November 2014 Processing Soy Beans
One liter of dried soy beans was made into a puree of five liters.About 250 ml of molasses was added to mask the soy flavor. A bowl of these beans is ingested for my daily breakfast.The liter storage containers are frozen until required. The beans will keep about seven days before molding in the refrigerator.
Method: Washed several times, boiled for one hour, drained and washed.Allowed to soak in water for 12 hours.Washed and rinsed,placed in a colander for pressure cooking with steam. Pressure cooked at 15 PSI for one hour. Soy beans don’t turn to mush with cooking. After removal from the pressure cooker, mixed with more water and 250 ml of molasses, plus the water left in the pressure cooker. Beat into a slurry with the hand blender.Stored in liter plastic containers and frozen until required.
Pressure Cooked

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Tortillas Corn and Beans

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?CEVNE 8 November 2014 Tortillas Corn and Beans
Eighteen tortillas were made with about 50% mixed beans, with nixtamalized home grown Indian corn, and Maseca, commercial flour to make the right texture. The tortillas were cooked in a cast iron frying pan, and placed in the microwave for one minute to cause ballooning. Th object was to make a convenient bread which can be eaten alone or stuffed with various food as desired.The tortillas are stored in a air tight plastic container kept in the refrigerator until required. They can also be frozen and revived by placing in the microwave for a time.
Here are links to the corn and beans, which were previously prepared.
http://www.durgan.org/URL/?YUNKR 27 October 2014 Pressure Cooking Dried Beans.
http://www.durgan.org/URL/?HPVDY 19 October 2014 Indian Corn Tortillas.Garden to Plate.
Tortilla Corn and Bean

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Tortillas

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?FKVFL 7 November 2014 Tortillas
Basically tortillas have replaced bread in my diet.About three or four tortillas are consumed daily.The corn is grown in my garden and nixtamalized and made into wet masa. The grinding is dead simple by using the blender. The liquid masa is then mixed with maseca, which is typical commercial corn flour, to make the dough of the proper texture for producing tortillas. This product is gluten free which is attractive to some. A quarter liter of corn produces about ten tortillas, which are relatively easy to make on a daily basis. Cooking is on a cast iron pan about 30 seconds each side, then placed in the microwave to balloon up. Photos depict the procedure.
Knife to remove.

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Nixtamalized Corn Tortillas

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?XPCZE 4 November 2014 Nixtamalized Corn Tortillas.
Tortillas were made from my own Indian corn mixed with commercial flour.Here is the process of making the tortillas from the masa produced as described in the following paragraph.
Perfect tortilla

The corn was ground in a blender and made a perfect base for mixing the dough to make tortillas. Here is the masa making procedure. http://www.durgan.org/URL/?YZYIN 3 November 2014 Grinding Nixtamal to Masa Most pople buy the commercial produced flour to make tortillas, due to ease of making,and the difficulty of grinding the nixtamal with existing hand grinders. This hybrid system solves the problem of grinding wet nixtamalized corn called nixtamal. The method is readily adapted for grinding other wet grains for use in some baking practices.

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Grinding Nixtamal to Masa

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?YZYIN 3 November 2014 Grinding Nixtamal to Masa
Utilizing raw corn, making flour or dough for tortillas is very difficult if doing the process when the corn is wet, which is the preferred method
The method presented here is a hybrid system, which is easy to implement. The corn is made into nixtamal in the typical manner.The nixtamal is then blended in a typical home blender with water. Only enough water is added to make a smooth slurry. The slurry is placed in a mixing bowl and enough corn flour commercial (Masa Harina)(Maseca) is added, mixed and kneaded to make a texture perfect for tortillas.
Masa

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Physalis peruviana (Cape Gooseberry) Ground Cherry

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?SOPKC 29 October 2014 Physalis peruviana (Cape Gooseberry)
The fruit was removed from three plants of ground cherry, Physalis peruviana, Cape Gooseberry. Two pounds of fruit was obtained. On this type of ground cherry most of the fruit does not fall to the ground when ripe. The fruit must be yellow in color, and if green should be discarded, since solanine is present and should not be ingested.This plant take about 9 months or longer to mature, so must be started indoors in Zone 5. The fruit may be ingested raw. Cooked with a small amount of water, just brought to a boil for about three minutes, it has a most agreeable flavor.
Cape Gooseberry

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Dehydrating Beans and Vacuum Packing

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?CBCWQ 28 October 2014 Dehydrating Beans and Vacuum Packing
Two hundred grams of pressured canned beans were dehydrated and vacuum packed for long term storage at ambient temperatures for back packing and camping.One liter of wet beans makes about four vacuum packages or one meal for one person. The vacuum packed beans are reconstituted by adding water and heating or even ingesting cold. Pictures depict the process.
Dehydrated Beans

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Pressure Cooking Dried Beans.

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?YUNKR 27 October 2014 Pressure Cooking Dried Beans.
A variety of dried beans was purchased from a bulk food store and pressure cooked.About a cup of each variety was utilized.Some of the names are not known, but a selection of what was available was purchased.

Method. About a cup of each variety of dried bean and a cup of nixtamalized corn was processed. The beans are washed thoroughly and placed in a large pot with water.The pot of beans was boiled for about one half hour. Upon removal from the heat the water is discarded.The beans were thoroughly rinsed and placed in the colander for insertion in the pressure cooker. The amount of water(about three liters) in the pressure cooker does not touch the beans.The colander prevents the beans from foaming and blocking the safety valve.The beans are cooked for at least one hour at 15 PSI. Beans must be fully cooked for digestion.

The beans upon removal from the pressure cooker are placed in a large pot with water and beat into a slurry with the hand blender.This slurry is then placed in containers and frozen for later use. The beans make a quick nourishing addition to meals.About seven liters were prepared. Condiments of choice may be added. Pictures depict the process.
Dried Beans

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Gruel. Five Grain

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?BWCIJ 25 October 2014 Gruel. Five Grain
A five grain pot of gruel was made. This is about a ten day supply of breakfast cereal for one person. Ingredients are nixtamalized corn, whole wheat kernels, almonds, sorghum, and large flake rolled oats. Each ingredient is blended into a slurry with water. All mixed together and cooked for about two hours in a double boiler. The double boiler inhibits burning by it not being necessary to stir very often when cooking. A bowl of the gruel is served for breakfast with some molasses for a bit of iron and sweetener, and skim milk. The gruel ingredients vary from batch to batch depending upon what is available. There is a large selection from which to choose, particularly in NA.
Cooked for Two hours.

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